Leaders in Lending
Leaders in Lending

Episode 57 · 6 months ago

A Macro View of the Big Trends in Banking in 2022

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

As the CEO & Co-Founder of Sandbox Banking, a company that connects financial institutions with fintechs, Ravi Balasubramanian has an excellent vantage point for all the innovation happening in the banking industry. 

In this episode, he shares the big trends he sees, his advice for banks making strides into digitization and his bold prediction for the future of cryptocurrency. 

We discuss:

  • How to gain the capacity for faster organizational decision making
  • The benefits of having different systems in Web3
  • Rising innovation in banking as a service
  • Common missteps in banking digitization 

To hear more from Leaders in Lending, check us out on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or on our website

Listening on a desktop & can’t see the links? Just search for Leaders in Lending on your favorite podcast player.

You're listening to leaders and lending from upstart, a podcast dedicated to helping consumer lenders grow their programs and improve their product offerings. Each week here, decision makers in the finance industry offer insights into the future of the lending industry best practices around digital transformation. In one let's get into the show. Welcome to leaders and lending. I'm your host, Jeff Keltner. This week's episode features my conversation with Robbie Ball of Supermanian Rab. Robbie, I apologize if I got that wrong. I think I got it. He's the cofounder and CEO of sandbox banking. There one of our partners for banks and credit unions on the integration side, and one of the things I love about bringing people like Robbie on are that they get to see technology and integration and innovation, products and projects across multiple institutions and so really the ability to draw on insights from projects different places, I think, what's working, what's not, what's common, what's effective across different kinds of institutions, and also a little bit of a Robbie store about how they got into you know, working with financial institutions not not necessarily the natural place for many to go and the text bas so I think it's really interesting conversation with a lot of insights for anybody who's looking to drawn a kind of a broader set of experiences and what's happening in that innovation technology space in the banking accredit union world. So with that, please enjoy this conversation with Robbie Bolla Supermanian. All right, Robbie, welcome to the PODCAST. Thanks for making the time to join us. Thanks for having a Jeff. I've been looking forward to this conversation because one of the things I love about people that have kind of in your role or from your advantage point is that you get perspective from multiple institutions that are doing some of the same projects, where I think it can be sometimes harder for someone in a single institution to see. You know where they fit and what they'll broader industry trends are. So I'd love to just understand what are the big trends you're seeing with clients in terms of projects are tackling priorities. They have things you're working on like. What are the big picture trends you're seeing from your vantage...

...point? So I think one Lens, Jeff, that were obviously seeing people having to react to is what's going on from a macroeconomic perspective. Of interest rates are going up and just the volatility around that is really starting to impact how they make decisions. So we are definitely seeing people look at decisionmaking from a how can I be faster or a little bit more nimble where I perhaps I'm not having to overcommit to very long timelines? That's one thing we're saying. I think we're continuing to see probably the same broader trend on the increased digitization around lending. Increasingly, of course, everyone understands how they can both originate on brand and through other strategies now using the whole banking of the service move. We're seeing some of this, with what rates are doing, expand back into deposit regination. And then the other piece which I've been finding quite interesting is just how people I've really been thinking about changing the way support is being done, particularly as we're all, you know, still in this hybrid work model with many of our customers still living completely online. Right. Yeah, so what did you know? A couple these, cause I think they're really interesting trends. First, this kind of fast iteration. You talk about the ability to kind of learner. What have you seen? You know, there's obviously a technology component to that, but I think it's also a cultural component. I'm curious where you've seen institutions adopt that well and where they've struggled and what the Delta is. So for for my bankers listening, like how do you get to build, both at an infrastructure level and at an organizational level, the capacity to kind of move more quickly in smaller chunks versus, you know, the kind of I think of it software terms because my back I would like to the big releases. You know I we don't want the big releases. We want the cloud style small learnings that compound over time. What have you seen be successful and helping people actually get to that place? That's interesting. On the organizational side of it, I would say there's perhaps...

...two pieces. One is, you know, the actual commitment to using some variation of the agile methodology. Again, we we operate within banking. So Up to a point it isn't completely software, but I do increasingly see teams in digital and in other areas really organized in that a Jile way. With me knowledge coming in from their counterparts in compliance or risk in all the areas, and that is a trend that you know. It's been super fascinating to see how more and more of our customers, particularly the ones that are moving faster into digital transformations at are just organized that way. The other thing I find is also just like, and I'm sure this is a little bit of manner and Trope, of just you have to allow for failure. You want people to fail. If they haven't failed, they we haven't taken en off risk. Obviously we're not talking about it's banking within grounds, but just organizationally and culturally like it's okay to fa that's part of it, and any think that is something. It's not always possible, but it didn't. I do find it being a differentiator, particularly when it comes to attracting and retaining talent. Right. Yeah, I feel like you have to shift that Lens to because nobody likes to say it's okay to fail. What what you really want to say is the objective is learning, and so, even if your hypothesis is wrong, as long as you had we actually define this. Now it upstart for a bunch of our projects. It's not only the business objective. We're trying to cheap. But what's the learning objective? And if we learn the thing, even if we didn't hit the business objective, then we've seen it on a level, because the learning objective, in the speed to learn, is really one of the critical things you've got to kind of. I think. Think that's like if you learn something valuable, it's not a fail you're now may not have been like showing the way success that you're going to double count on, but you learn something and you can use that to go on the next thing. And if you couple that with that agile methodology, which is like really that decomposition of your denominator into the finite chunks, you then for start learning in your next junk. You're now just better at it. So it's like when you couple those two, I really mean I've just...

...seen a drive some really nice results in the digital teams that I've seen using that and then switching over to you know, what you said is on the infrastructure learning. I think the one you know piece that I found has been a really great piece of learning is to just engage any of the existing vendors, whether those be core vendors or other loan rediecean system vendors just early on in the process so that they can present the best resources or you can get in schedule with them, versus thinking about those things after perhaps a lot of focus has been spent just in the Uiux. Yeah, talk about that a little bit side. One of the things I feel is a technologist in this space is that there's a I sometimes refer to as a shiny object syndrome and Silicon Valley. We want the cool, sexy features. I think people want to work on and I think the same is true here, where there's like an emphasis on the new UX, the new consumer experience, but sometimes the plumbing just very sexy, it's off behind the walls, is the thing that actually delivers the experience. Talk to me a bit about what you're seeing on that front in terms of people that are doing it well and how they're making those investments, not just in the brand new origination experience, let's say for a loan, but how that plugs into the broader ecosystem that the bank has and uses to support their customers. I think you know, you said the magic word, where ecosystem, where we're really starting to see the people who are kind of adopting the transformation side. Fastest is the realization that it is is broader ecosystem. There are already many services being provided by their core vendors and other providers and if they could, you know, get the most juice for the squeeze their first but it allows you, from an innovation port for your perspective, to just use the risk and now perhaps take more risk in certain other areas because you're not kind of completely rebuilding everything right. But I think people, you know, going back to that agile methodology. If you're...

...not thinking about it in that way and you're perhaps in this longer waterfall type approach, well, you then start thinking about things like integration in a very silod you're never going to really going to think about it any well, actually, if I'm able to retrieve details on our customers across all of their assets, my abilities with us, what are now on the other side of the Ux side of the equation, all the type of things, I could plug it in. But that's not necessarily being perhaps the way everyone has been able to think about it. But we do see kind of those leader optors really being able to think about it. And then once you set it up that way. You know, if you think about it from another dimension of how much do you yourself, as an institution one own and how much do you instead want to work with ecosystem partners, perhaps like a Sam box banking or others where it's a hey F I now work at them. I can get even more connectivity into the ecosystem. So we're starting to see people realize, oh, it's part of my innovation portfolio, I can include that, you know, network thinking on the infrastructure as well, and it's been yeah, it's been really fun to watch. This is a question that I've always struggled with in terms of understanding the bank ecosystems. I'm curious which you see that the technology and more than technology, maybe I'll say data ecosystem within an institution, which is like is the core really the central thing? Are there flows? I'm hearing some about some banks going, you know, from Los into a crm and not having the core be the certain how do you think about are there data lakes or, you know, dataware? How my wife was actually ask me the difference Beween Day Lake in the Daya whouse. I never good answer for other than ones a big building one's a piece of water. But you know, I think this question of like, are they building a day to layer that's outside of the core so that they could easily plug lots of stuff in? Are they really still using the course of what are you seeing as the trends around that data ecosystems? I'm curious and I don't feel like I've got a good many people ask me except at me to know and I don't know. So I'm going to ask somebody who deals with this more than I do and see what you say. So at the end of the day, it's still fragmented. Right, if you want to build a full...

...service institution, you end up needing services that are generally across provider and quite often, like if you're now super successful, are targeted it different and banking users even right, it just becomes a you know, it's almost a mycrofounder likes to say if you're successful, when you're growing, you're probably looking at even more integration points and even more nodes by virtue of you being successful. Right, let us perhaps you're so fine and you can just buy everything or your GP and you potentially have the option of building, but even they're you're seeing just the innovation portfolio has to be diversified. You you know you just can't do everything. Like you're not going to be able to do everything in web three. You're better off partnering. So we are seeing even that just be a like a port for your effect. But going back to your point in terms of the data, right, the data still lives in silos. So one of the things we really encourage our customers, I think that's think about it in terms of what is the end? Banking users need right forget where the data lives. Today, with tools like ours and increasingly with what the core providers in the system menders are doing in terms of making it easier to interconnect, that's getting better. But then now, what's the business value? Right, if you knew all of my holdings across insurance and etc. What can you now achieve? But those, those still live in different systems. We're seeing a lot of what you've described in terms of hybrid core strategies where perhaps, to you know, for some of the components that you're trying to move faster on, those are actually being held in perhaps a new core where I think the piece which has been the most interesting is, and I'm sure you guys. You know heard some of your guys talk about it. Is the actual advent of banking as a service where, even with this fairly fragmented set up you're still able to offer the those in a micro service architecture...

...externally to both in tax as well as increasingly other types of partners like yourselves. So, going back to actually answer your wife's question, all of the above right where we seen customers starting to build on things like snowflake. So we're definitely seeing everyone do what all other industries are doing and adopt cloud. It's the same trends through it. It's whatever is the best of breed that we're seeing people adopt it. But it's generally, I see, not necessarily be a complete replacement for their banking specific technology. It's normally a complement or to empower staff to use a modern crm and to engage customers. Right. It's so perhaps it's replacing an existing legacies here and they're using but it's not replacing their underlying core banking servicing system, because sales force doesn't have a core yet. Yeah, well, once be able our sales force Maga. They seem like they're pretty ambitious, but the thing you're saying is really interesting to me because it does feel like I do occasionally here bankers or, you know, banking technologists, thinking about, you know, one system to rule them all, right, this kind of vision of this monolithic thing that will kind of do it all, and I feel like what you're saying is except that that's not going to be the reality. In figure out how to deal with the world and what you're going to have different systems and some of them we have to speak to each other for you to be able to present a unified view across ass as to the customer or to a bank employee who's servicing a customer. And so you get like that vision of one, one thing to rule them all really isn't there. And that, of course, it frees you up to think about what's the best solution for this problem, not the solution that kind of does okay, at every problem, I want to call and even the you know, I think I was looking at this any in any time frame that makes economic sense for us right, which is the other part of the slider, because if you give up the idea of one thing to rule them all, it's a okay. Well, if it's if it's...

...for me to solve this problem, how quick can I go now, because I don't have to worry about solving every type of everything I can get. I just do want at a time and then when I'm ready, merge back. It seems like that puts a real premium on the ability to connect these systems you've got together, either at a day to layer, or at least at the presentation layer, for different use cases, whether again that customers online banking experience, that banker in the branch when you walk in and they want to know that you have mortgage and a car loan and a deplosit account, and then those are in three different systems. You gotta somehow bring those together. Are Do you have any advice around how to achieve that? That feels like one of those things you gotta you got to get right, but it is non trivial. I think this goes, I think one of the approaches back to where we were saying earlier. I find eighty twenty rule is a good group Rick there, because we've seen so many people get hung up on the I think, like you know, the example of what what do you do if a person who originated online now on to come and branch and pay in a hypothetical situation. So it's a okay, we could sit here and focus on that, or would you really just like to know when this person just got a very, very large transaction and you know has also been on your website looking for holenown offers? Right, is it we which is happening more often for you? Which would you like your bankers to be able to quickly respond to? And I think that having the ability to be able to stand up and say that internally, to say hey, it's okay that we won't have the solution for everything, but perhaps we can iterate on it with these new tools faster. It is different. Right. Perhaps that that hasn't always been necessarily to culture, but like you were saying earlier that for the ones that are moving into that more agile thinking framework, we actually really seeing that work. Even when it comes to the presentation of how do you think about a customer three hundred and sixty? Can Start with a very small, niche group and see what makes sense there and what were the issues, and...

...then let's expand the pilot to about population. Right. Yeah, it will just reminds me of the realities reminds me of you know, no road map ever survives contact with customers like you know. You think they're going to want X and and they don't and you never learned until your market. So that, Yep, that you need twenty rules, like what's the most value? What are we really trying to achieve? And then how do we learn most quickly so we can can find our way to achieving that value? Be supposed to the big list of requirements up front. That's a hundred percent. They were. Was the what's the twenty percent effort that gets has eighty percent of the stuff. Let's start with that and then let's see what what is the best next thing to build? Any other high level trends you see or or things you hear from customers and that I've got a different question for you, but I was curious. There's anything else on your list? I think it's it. It has been interesting, like you know, your questions around the strategy, around that core and just around and I think what does banking as a service mean for them? It is just been the thing. You know, it's been picking up, I think, more and more just over the last six to twelve months. I think that that's just an area where we just we just expect to see continued innovation just throughout the ecosystem. It's probably some of the most interesting stuff we've seen in the last can you define for me banking is a sir? I hear this term a lot and depending on who I hear from, it kind of means something different to them, at least in my interpretation. So when you say you're seeing more work around banking is a service, what do you what specifically you seeing and what's the most exciting stuff you're seeing in that space? So my cofounders, Guy, you know from the whole software is getting financial services back, if you believe in that. to He defines ban conserves or probably it's basically just a production and consumption of financial services by hpis right. It's just okay. And so you could say that hey, a bank using its internal systems to talk more effectively to each other. He's a nightpo banking as a service. or You could say, Hey, actually know, it's the bank using it's FDI see charter...

...and exposing Apis to an external party that's using the information to think that you know. Again, I think it becomes like you kind of said earlier. It's depends on who you're asking, but for me I kind of fundamentally think about if I was a banker looking at this, it's okay, well, I'm doing a whole bunch of things that I'm already doing on brand. Some of those perhaps I can use my technology to, you know, really partner with the underlying businesses who I'm helping, or the underlying consumers by offering them apis. I mean all of us have more and more piece of technology that just don't that's what the future is moving to. Or it's for bankers say hey, perhaps we don't always have the internal capability to do some of those things. We're actually much better focus in a certain portion of what we do, which is serving relationships we have. Perhaps there this is a way to attract more revenue or reduce cost by partnering with Ntext that need that banking fd se charter or access to the rails right. So I really see bankers starting to think about it. I think there's that spreadsheet that's out there on twitter. There's only sixty five of them today, yet there's elevenzero banks and credit unions. We expect those those numbers to start converge members to converge. What is the sixty five this spreadsheet? That's I've gotta have to go. So I think there's the number of banks that are out there that today have some sort of banking is can bankings of service where you can use their charter to start opening account. Some of them are offering lending. So it's a I think these are many of the Cross River so many of those other names that you would hear associated bankings of service. So it's still just a very small section. Yeah, all of just a US market, right. Yeah, that's true, and I think there are any number of banks that I talked to that I wouldn't have thought of as wanting to partner with fintax or wanting to provide that back in infrastructure and banking as a service, that that are...

...getting into that game and trying to use said something else was interesting, which was thinking of internal connectivity as kind of banking as a service. In that reminds me a little bit of kind of the famous aws Amazon approach where they kind of the different business units kind of treat each other, not quite like external customers but close and kind of that's how they end up with things. Like aws, where the service I built for my internal user was built as something that could be used by an external user and then it's that. It's both and that service kind of stands on its owner and I imagine there's a lot of pieces like that within banking that you can see. I'm right that way. I'm curious if there are examples. You've seen a people who are actually doing that, where they're starting to almost API enable between units and let them unlock the value outside of the business. None of these names will we just protect. I kind of use their name, but you know, so one of the customers, and this is very prototypical of how kind of they a lot of times we work with them, is the first thing was they are connecting their loan regination system, which is lying them, to allow online applications on their own brand. They're connecting that to their core to facilitate real time data movement back and forth. That whole thing is now exposed via API. They're using those Apis to not accelerate the rate it which they can buy loans from their banks, use that same Epi to nount not just have loans originating on their own brand, but you know, being able to buy loans from other banks partner with, hopefully other partners like upstart to again increase the amount of origination that they're able to do in, say, certain segments that today they're not originating themselves. So and now the last part of what they're doing is they're actually taking those Apis, just like you said, going out to other fintech partners that are also originating along the criteria that they've defined. Need the same capabilities that they've built, exact same map your endpoint. It goes to the same stages within, you know, various systems that they have for their staff to review. Uses the exact same underlying mlks, the rules...

...that they're using, and when it find me, ends up in their core and needs to be reported, it follows the same guideans that they've been using for existing reporting. So it's a it's it also is great from their internal perspective is they're not at they're not technologists, so when they internally need to report show their board, it's a look. We're using it to gain automation and stuff we were going to do anyway and, as you know, cawl walk run, it allows us to gain confidence, gain confidence into teams that are doing this and start exposing it. Yeah, so it's it's actually been really fascinating to watch as an approach interesting. You may not have an answer this, but it seems fascinating to me because you're talking about the ability to both, in some cases, consume expernal external expertise or capabilities that you can have and in some cases, you know, externalize and display capabilities that you do have. And it seems like different institutions could be and for the same item. One time you're saying, Hey, I don't not, me bring it in from the outside. Another place you're saying it is me, you know, externally, make it visible the ex let's take a specific let's make it even more specific. Perhaps you're a bank sitting near a coast. There for your flow, for certain you know coastal recreational vehicles is your profiles is very different from somebody in land. But perhaps that person's exposure to farm. So you know, for me it allows almost each one to start specializing in what they're really good at, but then also, when they hit limits, connect offload. That makes them for a really interesting conversation, I would think for the bankers of like where do we want to be the receiver and where do we want to be the as sender? And how does that to your point, shift maybe in the context of changing macroeconomic conditions or other and if you can hopefully now do that versus in the older world of immediately. In the old world was we needed more people to effectuate that shift. Today, of course you need people, but given where labor markets are, you just can't afford many decisions to require as many people anymore it. It's just fundamentally...

...not feasible. Yeah, so it's been really interesting to just see them see, Oh wow, these are just different tools as you build business cases for some of our strategies. That's been really fun to watch. So I want to briefly, before we run out of time, flip my the core of my questions be kind of like what are the positive things you've seen? Let me ask you this. One of the you know two or three top things you've seen that have you know led your your partners, your customers or other institutions you've seen down the wrong path, like mistakes. Is maybe a harsh worm of mistakes to avoid or things that are kind of like false starts to say hey, here's something to watch out for, something to not do. Sometimes I think we learn the most from the things that don't work out well versus the things that do. So what are the things you've seen that like are kind of watch out for? Maybe don't go down this path? I think some of these are definitely that shiny toy syndrome of is it just because everyone else says it's the right thing to do? HMM, do you really need to do it? And Are you? What are you saying no to by and sometimes it's a you know, that focus is too much on the Uiux or not necessarily thinking about kind of what could you just do in an MVP learn and then say that you'll get better, versus delaying your releases too much just because you thought you were right the very first time? That I think that that that idea is is just one that we see really part people. The other one, I find, is not necessarily thinking about what the staff experience. It's going to be right where it's obviously the goal of any of these things is to succeeding, be successful, but then if it's a that means you're just adding more load on people and not giving them time to learn. Obviously all of us learn differently. is almost learned by doing, somebody reading, and I often find there's not enough investment in that adoption part of the Innovation Cycle. There's too much spent on the hey, let's design...

...it, let's get it out, but then it's a well, you could probably have had something those five percent, seven percent not as good. But if you'd spend a little bit more time, like getting that buy in and getting people comfortable, can you feedback and showing them that you've done it, I just see one year out, people in a much better seat than those who had spent I think I could get this perfect thing, but then get really then you didn't have time left to spend with training. Right. Yeah, you're so fixated on in the feedback from the the people in the field, not just, you know, feedback from hit to the worker apple, like, how do I know I actually support our our customers are staff. It's a really fascinating one and I want to go back. I think I love this point you made. We do this whole the time, but the idea of framing the tradeoffs, of understanding the opportunity, because easily, like here's a list of stuff we can get done this quarter and forget, like and here's all the stuff that we think we'd like to do, but we're not going to get done because at some point you're saying I'm going to do this and you got to know. Instead of like what could I have done? We got a quarterly based up. But I think sometimes it it really helps you frame in on like what is the value I'm getting and I need to justify because there's this other thing I could be we could be doing with the resource, the time, the energy, and I think it can really clarify your thought. We always we sometime say about terms of trades. I'm trading, we could trade x four. Why is it? Is that a good trade? In whichever way you come you're making a trade. You're always trading x for Y. It's just whether you pick x or Y, and so I think sometimes that's a really great framing. I love that sense of unreally understanding what that opportunity cost is and I think it and part of his I was learning about. Learning about this as I think from when you're google that that whole concept of is it committed or aspirational, and having that discussion earlier on with folk to say this is committed, meaning it's okay if you didn't have to, you know. We know this is aspirational. So if you have to flex, flex there, but this is committing. You have to, you know. But letting them know upfront down those versus you know, things will go back. You know you're going to run in done for seeing things, but letting them know ahead of time, Hey, then let's...

...drop these. Let's not have to completely in the midst of the you know, stressful time, have to rethink everything. But this was aspirational. It's okay and because we live in an eight twenty world, we can come back later and fix it right. So I think it's it really have to get done. One are the things that are nice to have and thank yeah, interesting. Well, Robbie, I've enjoy this. I have the same three questions I used in the podcast for everybody, so I'd love to ask him to you now and just get your thoughts. The first is, what's the piece, best piece of career vice you've ever got? Go do where you're passionate about. Go do what you're passionate about. How did that lead you to what you're doing today? When me and my cofounder were working for Harvard Universities endownment, initially building software to help portforward managers. I think for us it was always how can we use the technology we're building to show just regular people like, you know, my parents or my cofounder sister, you can actually access data and make intelligent decisions yourself. So it was one of those we really wanted to show how people didn't think that they were developers could use technology and use data to get those insights. Yeah, it's what it's let us to leave Harvard and start this company and let's eventually really let us to build this lowcode integration builder for bankers. Love it. So my second question is, what's the best advice you've ever gotten about the Commun Sumer lending, consumer banking space? And this is probably for you a bit like for me, like a space you came into later in the path and so maybe a more recent learning. But I'm curious what the best advice for learning you've had about that spaces. I think it's actually like in the same analog as what you were saying earlier. It would it would keeps driving. My like eight twenty rule is that you really just need to get this into the hands of that end user, because you were definitely not going to be able to predict all the ways that they're going to end up doing this thing, using it. It's so it's like I rather to get into their hands and get that feedback ver versus hypothesize, because some of the most beautiful insights are from yea,...

...when meets the hands of users. Can anything else in the tech where other's nothing quite like watching a designer watch a user use their product and go yeah, yeah, that's no, no, why would you do that? Why would you click up one? Why did you go? Users have their own perspective and you never really know what it is. And I think for bankers, as we think about this digital transformation right, I think in just like for me, that that was a skill I learned later in my career, like working in port for your management. Think that wasn't necessarily something I'd ever done. So when it's it's you know, some of it goes back to that. But then when you teach the bankers, by the way, that's why we're telling you to do this. If you get good at this, you can just keep doing this and interecut your tools and you'll just get better and better. Hmm, but that does require you to just look and watch and see how the customers are using it, which wasn't necessarily always something that they were pasted with doing. Right. Yeah, it's a different it's a different muscle. Yeah, all right. So last question. What's one bold prediction for the future? Who? I've only stumped one guest with this. He just forgot to prepare a bit. One bold prediction about the future. I think we'll have a central bank digital coin in America in two thousand and twenty three. In Two thousand and twenty three, that's a bold prediction. I feel like you're going to get an invite back to see if you were right or wrong. I will wait for the Central Bank digital currency in two thousand and twenty three. That feels like an interesting it's a good bold prediction. And we even talked about crypto today. Can come back to do that another time. The robber, thanks so much for joining a day sharing your incize. Is a really fascinating conversation. I appreciate your making the time. Thanks so much to I appreciate it. Upstart partners with banks and credit unions to help grow their consumer loan portfolios and deliver a modern, all digital lending experience. As the average consumer becomes more digitally savvy, it only makes sense that their bank does to. Upstarts. Ai Landing Platform uses sophisticated machine learning models to more accurately identify risk and approve more applicants than traditional credit models.

With fraud rates near zero. Upstarts all digital experience reduces manual processing for banks and offers a simple and convenient experience for consumers. Whether you're looking to grow and enhance your existing personal and auto learning programs or you're just getting started, upstart can help. Upstart offers an into in solution that can help you find more credit worthy borrowers within your risk profile, with all digital underwriting, onboarding, loan closing and servicing. It's all possible with upstart in your corner. Learn more about finding new borrowers, enhancing your credit decisioning process and growing your business by visiting UPSTARTCOM Ford Banks. That's UPSTARTCOM foard banks. You've been listening to leaders and lending from upstart. Make sure you never miss an episode. Subscribe to leaders and lending in your favorite podcast player using apple podcast. Leave us a quick rating by tapping the number of stars you think the show deserves thanks for listening until next time. The views and opinions expressed by the host and guests on the leaders and lending podcast are their own and their participation in this podcast does not imply an endorsement of such views by their organization or themselves. The content provided is for informational purposes only and the discussion between the host and guests should not be taken as financial advice by companies or individuals.

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